Preservation50 wishes to empower local preservationists to add their own efforts to the celebration. We encourage you to make use of one of the six Preservation50 logos. Incorporating the logos into your local Preservation50 event, program, or initiative can increase public awareness of the national celebration and help promote historic and cultural preservation across the nation.

Special thanks to designers Slavisa Jajcanin and Griswold, freelance designers, for their contributions to the logo designs.

Guidelines for Using the Preservation50 Logos

  • The logos may be used for any non-commercial purpose related to the anniversary.
  • Preservation50 reserves the exclusive right to reproduce the logos on articles of clothing and other commercial items. Visit the shop.
  • Artwork is available to download in a number of file types for both offline and online use. Please do not attempt to recreate the logos.
  • The logos may be reproduced electronically or in print.
  • When you download the logos, you agree to the Terms of Use.

small Logo

DOWNLOAD

small Logo

DOWNLOAD

small Logo

DOWNLOAD

small Logo

DOWNLOAD

small Logo

DOWNLOAD

small Logo

DOWNLOAD


About the Logos

small Logo

Passed at a time when highway improvements were overwhelming historic resources along the country’s roads, railroads, and rivers, the National Historic Preservation Act established one of the most important federal environmental review processes for protection of historic properties. Under Section 106 of the law, federal agencies must consider the effects on historic properties of projects they carry out, approve, or fund, and must consult with interested parties in order to try to minimize adverse effects. Whether the federal government is funding replacement of an historic bridge, managing federal land, or licensing a new cell tower, Section 106 review helps protect significant historic properties. Many historic bridges, some no longer adequate for modern transportation needs, have found new uses along biking and hiking trails while providing important reminders of how our country developed.

 

 


 

small Logo

A key creation of the National Historic Preservation Act is the National Register of Historic Places, the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. Many historic homes are listed on the National Register, as are many other kinds of properties – commercial buildings, schools, urban and rural historic districts, bridges, archaeological sites, monuments, and more – encompassing 1.4 million individual resources. The National Historic Preservation Act has helped encourage the renovation, repair, rehabilitation, and restoration of historic homes and other properties throughout the nation, enhancing our quality of life. Property owners and investors benefit from grants, tax incentives, and technical assistance made available through the law and related programs over the years.

 

 


 

small Logo

The National Historic Preservation Act recognizes our cultural heritage in all its richness and variety. Preserving places like the traditional adobe and stone communities of the Pueblo Indians and related ruins of ancient cultures lets us learn from, and experience, one of the many threads in our American tapestry. Consultation with Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations regarding historic properties of significance to them – particularly sacred sites – has been required since amendments to the law in 1992.

 

 

 

 


small Logo

Archaeological sites have important stories to tell that supplement available written records, as do more obvious and visible historic buildings and cultural landscape features.  The National Historic Preservation Act recognizes the importance of discovering, preserving, and learning from the buried remnants of societies that came before us. Archaeological resources that contribute to our understanding of the past – whether from the last century or thousands of years ago – share the same protections as above-ground resources.

 

 

 


 

small Logo

In 2000, the National Historic Preservation Act was amended to help preserve some of America’s most iconic historic resources – lighthouses and their often spectacular settings. The law now includes a process for transferring federally owned lighthouses to new owners who will preserve and interpret these historic structures. Such resources and the programs that support their preservation remind us that we are a country with a rich maritime history (on three coasts, the Great Lakes, and myriad bays, rivers, and lakes), where Americans have lived, worked, and played for generations.

 

 

 


 

small Logo

The National Historic Preservation Act sets up a system for distributing federal dollars to states, Indian tribes, and communities, to assist them in understanding and preserving their significant historic properties. A portion of this money is earmarked for local governments, many of which use the funding to help revitalize their historic downtowns and promote heritage tourism. Communities across the country are seeing economic, social, and environmental benefits from preserving their local character and reusing historic resources for contemporary purposes.